Archive for the ‘transposable elements’ Category

High Coverage PacBio Shotgun Sequences Aligned to the D. melanogaster Genome

Shortly after we released our pilot dataset of Drosophila melanogaster PacBio genomic sequences in late July 2013, we were contacted by Edwin Hauw and Jane Landolin from PacBio to collaborate on the collection of a larger dataset for D. melanogaster with longer reads and higher depth of coverage. Analysis of our pilot dataset revealed significant differences between the version of the ISO1 (y; cn, bw, sp) strain we obtained from the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center (strain 2057) and the D. melanogaster reference genome sequence. Therefore, we contacted Susan Celniker and Roger Hoskins at the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in order to use the same subline of ISO1 that has been used to produce the official BDGP reference assemblies from Release 1 in 2000 to Release 5 in 2007. Sue and Charles Yu generated high-quality genomic DNA from a CsCl preparation of ~2000 BDGP ISO1 adult males collected by Bill Fisher, and provided this DNA to Kristi Kim at PacBio in mid-November 2013 who handled library preparation and sequencing, which was completed early December 2013. Since then Jane and I have worked on formatting and QC’ing the data for release. These data have just been publicly released without restriction on the PacBio blog, where you can find a description of the library preparation, statistics on the raw data collected and links to preliminary de novo whole genome assemblies using the Celera assembler and PacBio’s newly-released FALCON assembler. Direct links to the raw, preassembled and assembled data can be found on the PacBio “Drosophila sequence and assembly” DevNet GitHub wiki page.

Here we provide an alignment of this high-coverage D. melanogaster PacBio dataset to the Release 5 genome sequence and some initial observations based on this reference alignment. Raw, uncorrected reads were mapped using blasr (-bestn 1 -nproc 12 -minPctIdentity 80) and converted to .bam format using samtools. Since reads were mapped to the the Release 5 genome, they can be conveniently visualized using the UCSC Genome Browser by loading a BAM file of the mapped reads as a custom track. To browse this data directly on the European mirror of the UCSC Genome Browser click here, or alternatively paste the following line into the “Paste URLs or data:” box on the “Add Custom Tracks” page of the Release 5 (dm3) browser:

track type=bam bigDataUrl=http://bergmanlab.genetics.uga.edu/data/tracks/dm3/dm3PacBio.bam name=dm3PacBio

As shown in the following figure, mapped read depth is roughly Poisson distributed with a mean coverage of ~90x-95x on the autosomal arms and ~45x coverage for the X-chromosome. A two-fold reduction in read depth on the X relative to the autosomes is expected in a DNA sample only from heterogametic XY males. Mapped read depth is important to calculate empirically post hoc (not just based on theoretical a priori expectations) since the actual genome size of D. melanogaster is not precisely known and varies between males and females, with an upper estimate of the total male genome size (autosomes + X + Y) being ~220 Mb. Thus, we conclude the coverage of this dataset is of sufficient depth to generate long-range de novo assemblies of the D. melanogaster genome using PacBio data only, as confirmed by the preliminary Celera and FALCON assemblies.

coverage

The following browser screenshots show representative regions of how this high coverage PacBio dataset maps to the Release 5 reference genome:

  • A typical region of unique sequence (around the eve locus). Notice that read coverage is relatively uniform across the genome and roughly equal on the forward (blue) and reverse (red) strands. Also notice that some reads are long enough to span the entire distance between neighboring genes, suggesting unassembled PacBio reads are now long enough to establish syntenic relationships for neighboring genes in Drosophila from unassembled reads.
eve
  • A typical region containing a transposable element (TE) insertion (in the ds locus), in this case a 8126 bp roo LTR retrotransposon (FBti0019098). Substantial numbers of mapped reads align across the junction region of the TE and its unique flanking regions. However, there is an excess of shorter reads inside the boundaries of the TE, which are likely to be incorrectly mapped because they are shorter than the length of the active TE sequence and have mapping quality values of ~0. With suitable read length and mapping quality filters, the unique location of TE insertions in the euchromatin should be identifiable using uncorrected PacBio reads.

ds

  • One of the few remaining and persistent gaps in the euchromatic portion of the reference sequence that can be filled using PacBio sequences. This gap remains in the upcoming Release 6 reference sequence (Sue Celniker and Roger Hoskins, personal communication). This shows blasr can align PacBio reads through smaller sequence gaps that are represented by padded N’s, however the visualization of such reads may sometimes be flawed (i.e. by artificially displaying a gap in the mapped read that arises from a lack of alignment to the ambiguous nucleotides in the gap).

gap

Below we provide a reproducible transcript of the code used to (i) setup our working environment, (ii) download and unpack this D. melanogaster PacBio dataset, (iii) generate the BAM file of mapped reads released here, and (iv) generate coverage density plots for the major chromosome arms shown above. Part of the rationale for providing these scripts is to showcase how simple it is to install the entire PacBio smrtanalysis toolkit, which is the easiest way we’ve found to install the blasr long-read aligner (plus get a large number of other goodies for processing PacBio data like pacBioToCA, pbalign, quiver, etc).

These scripts are written to be used by someone with no prior knowledge of PacBio data or tools, and can be run on a Oracle Grid Engine powered linux cluster running Scientific Linux (release 6.1).  They should be easily adapted for use on any linux platform supported by PacBio’s smrtanalysis toolkit, and to run on a single machine just execute the commands inside the “quote marks” on the lines with qsub statements.

(i) First, let’s download the Release 5 reference genome plus the smrtanalysis toolkit:

#!/bin/bash

# get dm3 and reformat into single fasta file
echo "getting dm3 and reformatting into single fasta file"
wget -q http://hgdownload.soe.ucsc.edu/goldenPath/dm3/bigZips/chromFa.tar.gz
tar -xvzf chromFa.tar.gz
cat chr*.fa > dm3.fa
rm chromFa.tar.gz chr*.fa

#install PacBio smrtanalysis suite (including blasr PacBio long-read mapping engine)
echo "installing PacBio smrtanalysis suite"
wget http://programs.pacificbiosciences.com/l/1652/2013-11-05/2tqk4f
bash smrtanalysis-2.1.1-centos-6.3.run --extract-only --rootdir ./
rm smrtanalysis-2.1.1-centos-6.3.run
setupDrosPacBioEnv.shview rawview file on GitHub

If you want to have the smrtanalysis tooklit in your environment permanently, you’ll need to add the following magic line to your .profile:

source install/smrtanalysis-2.1.1.128549/etc/setup.sh

(ii) Next, let’s get the D. melanogaster PacBio data and unpack it:

#!/bin/bash

#get compressed .tar archives of D. melanogaster PacBio runs
echo "get tar archives of PacBio runs"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.tgz "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro1_24NOV2013_398.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.tgz "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro2_25NOV2013_399.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.tgz "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro3_26NOV2013_400.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.tgz "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro4_28NOV2013_401.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.tgz "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro5_29NOV2013_402.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.tgz  "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro6_1DEC2013_403.tgz"

#get md5sums for PacBio .tar archives
echo "getting md5sums for PacBio tar archives"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.md5 "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro1_24NOV2013_398.md5"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.md5 "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro2_25NOV2013_399.md5"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.md5 "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro3_26NOV2013_400.md5"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.md5 "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro4_28NOV2013_401.md5"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.md5 "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro5_29NOV2013_402.md5"
qsub -b y -cwd -N wget_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.md5  "wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/datasets.pacb.com/2014/Drosophila/raw/Dro6_1DEC2013_403.md5"

#verify .tar archives have been downloaded properly
echo "verifying archives have been downloaded properly"
qsub -b y -cwd -N md5_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.md5 -hold_jid wget_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.tgz,wget_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.md5 "md5sum -c Dro1_24NOV2013_398.md5 > Dro1_24NOV2013_398.md5.checkresult"
qsub -b y -cwd -N md5_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.md5 -hold_jid wget_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.tgz,wget_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.md5 "md5sum -c Dro2_25NOV2013_399.md5 > Dro2_25NOV2013_399.md5.checkresult"
qsub -b y -cwd -N md5_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.md5 -hold_jid wget_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.tgz,wget_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.md5 "md5sum -c Dro3_26NOV2013_400.md5 > Dro3_26NOV2013_400.md5.checkresult"
qsub -b y -cwd -N md5_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.md5 -hold_jid wget_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.tgz,wget_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.md5 "md5sum -c Dro4_28NOV2013_401.md5 > Dro4_28NOV2013_401.md5.checkresult"
qsub -b y -cwd -N md5_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.md5 -hold_jid wget_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.tgz,wget_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.md5 "md5sum -c Dro5_29NOV2013_402.md5 > Dro5_29NOV2013_402.md5.checkresult"
qsub -b y -cwd -N md5_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.md5  -hold_jid wget_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.tgz,wget_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.md5  "md5sum -c Dro6_1DEC2013_403.md5  > Dro6_1DEC2013_403.md5.checkresult"

#extract PacBio runs
echo "extracting PacBio runs"
qsub -b y -cwd -N tar_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.tgz -hold_jid wget_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.tgz "tar -xvzf Dro1_24NOV2013_398.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N tar_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.tgz -hold_jid wget_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.tgz "tar -xvzf Dro2_25NOV2013_399.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N tar_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.tgz -hold_jid wget_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.tgz "tar -xvzf Dro3_26NOV2013_400.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N tar_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.tgz -hold_jid wget_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.tgz "tar -xvzf Dro4_28NOV2013_401.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N tar_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.tgz -hold_jid wget_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.tgz "tar -xvzf Dro5_29NOV2013_402.tgz"
qsub -b y -cwd -N tar_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.tgz  -hold_jid wget_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.tgz  "tar -xvzf Dro6_1DEC2013_403.tgz"

#delete .tar archives and md5 files
qsub -V -b y -cwd -N rm_tar_md -hold_jid tar_Dro1_24NOV2013_398.tgz,tar_Dro2_25NOV2013_399.tgz,tar_Dro3_26NOV2013_400.tgz,tar_Dro4_28NOV2013_401.tgz,tar_Dro5_29NOV2013_402.tgz,tar_Dro6_1DEC2013_403.tgz "rm Dro*.tgz Dro*.md5"
getDrosPacBioData.shview rawview file on GitHub

(iii) Once this download is complete, we’ll map data from all of the cells to the Release 5 reference and merge the output into a single file of mapped (.bam), retaining unmapped (.unaligned) reads:

#!/bin/bash

#map .bax.h5 files from individual PacBio cells to Release 5 using blasr
echo "mapping .bax.h5 files to Release 5"
samples=()
for input in `ls Dro*/*/*/*bax.h5` 
do
 sample=`basename $input .bax.h5`
 output1="${sample}.sam"
 output2="${sample}.unaligned"
 qsub -l cores=12 -V -b y -cwd -N blasr_${sample} "install/smrtanalysis-2.1.1.128549/analysis/bin/blasr $input dm3.fa -bestn 1 -nproc 12 -minPctIdentity 80 -sam -out $output1 -unaligned $output2"
 qsub -V -b y -cwd -N sort_${sample} -hold_jid blasr_${sample} "install/smrtanalysis-2.1.1.128549/analysis/bin/samtools view -bS $output1 | install/smrtanalysis-2.1.1.128549/analysis/bin/samtools sort - $sample"
 samples+=(sort_${sample})
done

#merge bam files from individual cells and index merged bam file
echo "merging and indexing bam files"
holdlist=`printf -- '%s,' "${samples[@]}"`
input="m131*_p0*.bam"
output="dm3PacBio.bam"
qsub -V -b y -cwd -N merge_pacbio -hold_jid $holdlist "install/smrtanalysis-2.1.1.128549/analysis/bin/samtools merge $output $input"
qsub -V -b y -cwd -N index_pacbio -hold_jid merge_pacbio "install/smrtanalysis-2.1.1.128549/analysis/bin/samtools index $output"

#merge unmapped reads and remove .sam, .bam and .unaligned files from individual cells
echo "merging unmapped reads and cleaning up"
qsub -V -b y -cwd -N merge_unmapped -hold_jid index_pacbio "cat m131*unaligned > dm3PacBio.unaligned"
qsub -V -b y -cwd -N rm_cell_files -hold_jid merge_unmapped "rm m131*unaligned m131*bam m131*sam"


mapDrosPacBioData.shview rawview file on GitHub

(iv) Last, let’s generate the coverage plot shown above using the genome coverage utility in Aaron Quinlan’s BedTools package, R and imagemagick:

wget http://bergmanlab.genetics.uga.edu/data/tracks/dm3/dm3PacBio.bam
wget https://raw.github.com/bergmanlab/blogscripts/master/dm3PacBioCoverage.R
mysql --user=genome --host=genome-mysql.cse.ucsc.edu -A -e "select chrom, size from dm3.chromInfo" > dm3.genome
bedtools genomecov -ibam dm3PacBio.bam -g dm3.genome > dm3.genome.coverage
R --no-save < dm3PacBioCoverage.R
convert -density 300 -quality 100 dm3PacBioCoverage.pdf dm3PacBioCoverage.jpg

Credits: Many thanks to Edwin, Kristi, Jane and others at PacBio for providing this gift to the genomics community, to Sue, Bill and Charles at BDGP for collecting the flies and isolating the DNA used in this project, and to Sue and Roger for their contribution to the design and analysis of the experiment. Thanks also to Jane, Jason Chin, Edwin, Roger, Sue and Danny Miller for comments on the draft of this blog post.

On genome coordinate systems and transposable element annotation

[Update: For an extended discussion of the issues in this post, see: Bergman (2012) A proposal for the reference-based annotation of de novo transposable element insertions” Mobile Genetic Elements 2:51 – 54]

Before embarking on any genome annotation effort, it is necessary to establish the best way to represent the biological feature under investigation. This post discusses how best to represent the annotation of transposable element (TE) insertions that are mapped to (but not present in) a reference genome sequence (e.g. from mutagenesis or re-sequencing studies), and how the standard coordinate system in use today causes problems for the annotation of TE insertions.

There are two major coordinate systems in genome bioinformatics, that differ primarily in whether they anchor genomic feature to (“base coordinate systems”) or between (“interbase coordinate systems”) nucleotide positions. Most genome annotation portals (e.g. NCBI or Ensembl), bioinformatics software (e.g. BLAST) and annotation file formats (e.g. GFF) use the base coordinate system, which represents a feature starting at the first nucleotide as position 1. In contrast, a growing number of systems (e.g. UCSC, Chado, DAS2) employ the interbase coordinate system, whereby a feature starting at the first nucleotide is represented as position 0. Note, the UCSC genome bioinformatics team actually use both systems and refer to the base coordinate system as “one-based, fully-closed” (used in the UCSC genome browser display) and interbase coordinate system as “zero-based, half-open” (used in their tools and file formats), leading to a FAQ about this issue by users. The interbase coodinate system is also referred to as “space-based” by some authors.

The differences between base (bottom) and interbase (top) coordinate system can be visualized in the following diagram (taken from the Chado wiki).

There are several advantage for using the interbase coordinate system including: (i) the ability to represent features that occur between nucleotides (like a splice site), (ii) simpler arithmetic for computing the length of features (length=end-start) and overlaps (max(start1,start2), min(end1,end2)) and (iii) more rational conversion of coordinates from the positive to the negative strand (see discussion here).

So why is the choice of coordinate system important for the annotation of TEs mapped to a reference sequence? The short answer is that TEs (and other insertions) that are not a part of the reference sequence occur between nucleotides in the reference coordinate system, and therefore it is difficult to accurately represent the location of a TE on base coordinates. Nevertheless, base coordinate systems dominate most of genome bioinformatics and are an established framework that one has to work within.

How then should we annotate TE insertions on base coordinates that are mapped precisely to a reference genome? If a TE insertion in reality occurs between positions X and X+1 in a genome, do we annotate the start and end position both at the same nucleotide? If so, do we annotate the start/stop coordinate at position X, or both at position X+1? If we chose to annotate the insertion at position X, then we need to invoke a rule that the TE inserts after nucleotide X. However this solution breaks down if the insertion is on the negative strand, since we either need to map a negative strand insertion to X+1 or have a different rule for interpreting the placement of the TE on positive and negative strands. Alternatively, do we annotate the TE as starting at X and ending at X+1, attempting to fake interbase coordinates on a base coordinate system, but at face value implying that the TE insertion is not mapped precisely and spans 2 bp in the genome.

After grappling with this issue for some time, it seems that neither of these solutions is sufficient to deal with the complexities of TE insertion and reference mapping. To understand why, we must consider the mechanisms of TE integration and how TE insertions are mapped to the genome. Most TEs create staggered cuts to the genomic DNA that are filled on integration into the genome leading to short target site duplications (TSDs). Most TEs also target a palindromic sequence, and insert randomly with respect to orientation. A new TE insertion is typically mapped to the genome by sequencing a fragment that spans the TE into unique flanking DNA, either by directed (e.g. inverse/linker PCR) or random (e.g. shotgun re-sequencing) approaches. The TE-flank fragment can be obtained from the 5′ or 3′ end of the TE. However, where one places the TE insertion depends on whether one uses the TE-flank from the 5′ or 3′ end and the orientation of the TE insertion in the genome. As shown in the following diagram, for an insertion on the positive strand (>>>), a TE-flank fragment from the 5′ end is annotated to occur at the 3′ end of the TSD (shown in bold), whereas a 3′ TE-flank fragment is placed at the 5′ end of the TSD.  For an insertion on the negative strand (<<<), the opposite effect occurs. In both cases, TE-flank fragments from the 5′ and 3′ end map the TE insertion to different locations in the genome.

Thus, where one chooses to annotate a TE insertion relative to the TSD is dependent on the orientation of the TE insertion and which end is mapped to the genome. As a consequence, both the single-base and two-base representations proposed above are flawed, since TE insertions into the same target site are annotated at two different locations on the positive and negative strand. This issue lead us (in retrospect) to misinterpret some aspects of the P-element target site preference in a recent paper, since FlyBase uses a single-base coordinate system to annotate TE insertions.

As an alternative, I propose that the most efficient and accurate way to represent TE insertions mapped to a reference genome on base coordinates is to annotate the span of the TSD and label the orientation of the TE in the strand field. This formulation allows one to bypass having to chose where to locate the TE relative to the TSD (5′ vs. 3′, as is required under the one-base/two-base annotation framework), and can represent insertions into the same target site that occur on different strands. Furthermore, this solution allows one to use both 5′ and 3′ TE-flank information. In fact, the overlap between coordinates from the 5′ and 3′ TE-flank fragments defines the TSD. Finally, this solution requires no prior information about TSD length for a given TE family, and also accommodates TE families that generate variable length TSDs since the TSD is annotated on a per TE basis.

The only problem left open by this proposed solution is for TEs that do not create a TSD, which have been reported to exist. Any suggestions for a general solution that also allows for annotation of TE insertions without TSDs would be much appreciated….

Configuring REannotate Apollo Tiers Files on OSX

Posted 23 Jun 2009 — by caseybergman
Category genome bioinformatics, OSX hacks, transposable elements

Vini Pereira has recently published a nice paper on his REannotate package for defragmenting pieces of dead and nested transposable elements (TEs) detected using RepeatMasker. Defragmentation is an important aspect of accurately annotating and data mining transposable elements (as Hadi Queseneville and I have discussed in our 2007 review article on TE bioinformatics resources).

One of the nice features of REannotate is the ability to output GFF files ready for import into the Apollo genome annotation and curation tool. Although there is excellent documentation for configuring Apollo and REannotate provides a custom “tiers” file to properly display defragmented TE annotations, I struggled a bit to get these to work together on OSX based on the REannotate documentation. Partly my difficulty arose because the location of the “conf/” directory for the Apollo installation on OSX is not explicit, and in the end finding this directory provided two alternate solutions to this problem. Both solutions assume Apollo was installed via the .dmg file

Solution 1: This solution should be platform independent of the location of the conf/ directory.

$cd $HOME/.apollo
$wget -O ensj.tiers http://www.bioinformatics.org/reannotate/download/REannotate.tiers
Launch Apollo
Import REannotate GFF file and associated FASTA sequence.
Select File->Save Type Preferences..
Save As: ensj.tiers

Solution 2: This solution is OSX specific, and depends on the location of the conf/ directory.

$cd $HOME/.apollo
$wget -O REannotate.tiers http://www.bioinformatics.org/reannotate/download/REannotate.tiers
$cat /Applications/Apollo.app/Contents/Resources/app/conf/ensj.tiers REannotate.tiers > ensj.tiers
Launch Apollo
Import REannotate GFF file and associated FASTA sequence.

One final note: I find it helpful to “grep -v un-RepeatMasked_sequence” the REannotate GFF files before loading into Apollo to get rid of non-RepeatMasked annotations.